Wednesday, June 08, 2011

Deep Fried Scones (Sopapillas)

Scones 5-30-11

I have become a lover of scones—the English ones, the little (or big!) biscuit like tea scones that seem to be all the rage, but my family has not embraced them.  Growing up and even still, in my house and family and surroundings, if you say scones, people think of deep fried scones (also known as sopapillas).  So easy to make, so much like a fresh donut without the hole and dangerously delicious.  So we made them for family night last week.  The boys (and Kevin!) really like fried food!  It is a rare occasion that I give in and fry them up something.

These are best (in my opinion) still warm with butter and a nice drizzle of honey.  They are also good with some cinnamon and sugar or a dusting of powdered sugar.  The boys devoured a few big ones each.  I will admit to possibly eating the one in the photo.    You can make them any size you’d like.  I believe these would work with any type of roll dough, cinnamon roll dough or most bread dough.  You take the desired amount (depending on what size you’d like them) of risen dough and flatten it out to between 1/2 and 1/4 inch thickness with your hands (no rolling pin needed).  Then you just fry it (a minute or two per side) and drain them on paper towels set on a cooling rack.  You can find recipes all over the internet and they are most often called sopapillas, but growing up we always called them scones.  I found a recipe on www.recipegoldmine.com for Granny Annie’s Deep-Fried Scones, which happens to be a local SLC family restaurant.  I decided to go with that recipe although I think when it was written up and posted on Recipe Goldmine, they must of halved part of the recipe and not other parts of it.  I didn’t realize it until I’d already started making it and ended up using over 10 cups of flour and having A LOT of dough!  I froze a bunch of it in golf ball sized amounts to use at a later time as well as made a pan of cinnamon rolls with part of the dough.  But we were definitely able to make plenty of fresh deep fried scones that night!  Here’s my adapted (and corrected) version of the recipe.

Deep Fried Scones, by Katrina, Baking and Boys!

1 teaspoon active dry yeast

1/4 cup plus 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar (divided use)

1/2 cup warm water

1/2  teaspoon salt

1 large egg

1/2 cup warm milk (I used 2%)

1/2 cup canola oil

1 cup warm water

4-5 cups all purpose flour

In a large bowl, combine yeast, 1/2 teaspoon sugar and 1/2 cup warm water.  Let the mixture sit until bubbly (about 5 minutes).  Stir in 1/2 cup sugar, salt, egg, milk and oil.  With a wooden spoon, stir in flour a cup at a time, mixing after each addition.  Once the dough is not too sticky, but still soft and well kneaded together (this only takes a few minutes), cover it and let rise until double in size (about an hour). 

In a large, deep skillet (or a deep fryer), heat about 2 inches of canola oil to 375 degrees.  Pull off amount of dough for the size of scone desired and stretch it out to about 1/2 to 1/4 inch thick.  (The thinner the better.)  Place the dough in the hot oil.  Deep fry until golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes on the first side and another minute or so on the other side.  Remove from oil and drain on paper towels lining a cooling rack.  Serve warm with butter and honey, or cinnamon and sugar or powdered sugar. 

DSCF5353 

These are worth every calorie, carbohydrate and fat gram—occasionally. ;)

21 comments:

Amy Franklin said...

They are so Utah! Or maybe West Coast, because I called them scones too. I LOVE them, especially with honey butter. Yum!!!

Kayte said...

Next time you make these, I'M FAMILY, okay??? I want an invitation! My oh my those look sinfully good...stop it!

Cheri Sicard said...

Love Sopapillas. They are one of my earliest childhood food memories. At that point in my oung life, I had never had anything so delicious!

Jersey Girl Cooks said...

Oh, yum! I love any type of dough that is fried.

Barbara Bakes said...

These are the kind of scones we love at our house too. Your picture is mouthwatering!

Lisa said...

When I was younger, I thought that scones were always supposed to be this way. And of course, honey butter is a must.

Amy said...

These fried scones look amazing. I'm sure everyone loves them in your family. If I make that once in my kitchen, I'm sure my family will request these very often! Thanks for sharing. :)

Amy
http://utry.it

Paula {Salad in a Jar} said...

Love sopapillas but never heard them called deep fried scones. These look so good and reminds me it has been a while since I've had honey dripping down my chin while eating them. Now I can remedy that situation.

Kristen said...

Oh how I love sopapillas!

Cookin' Canuck said...

The first time I order a scone in a Utah restaurant, I was a bit surprised when a sopapilla arrived. Not that I'm complaining - really, who doesn't like fried dough. I'd love to try this recipe at home.

jillbert said...

A topping of cinnamon sugar sounds perfect. Who doesn't like fried dough?

Deborah said...

These were the only kind of scones I knew until I started blogging!! Love them!

Chaya said...

I think, YUMMY, says it all.

TeaLady said...

These remind me of fry bread, which we love. Have to try this version. LOOK great!!

Jannett said...

It sounds like a winning combination for sure.. ;o)

Pegasuslegend said...

I was twenty last time I made these, I forgot how good they were.. was in a cooking school... love your recipe and will be making these again soon now! thanks Katrina!~

Assistant said...

oh wow those look DELICIOUS. my stomach is growling now. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

Which do you think works better? a deep fryer or deep skillet?

Thanks!
Liz-CoolProducts

Avanika [YumsiliciousBakes] said...

I've never even heard of these. Thank you Katrina :) I can't wait to try these, and become a big blob of fat :)

Megan's Cookin' said...

My mom was from Idaho and she use to make these scones every time she made potato bread. I love them!

Jackie said...

I see you have water listed twice --- 1/2 cup and then 1 cup warm water. Can't see in the instructions where I use the second instance of the water.

Katrina said...

Jsckie, thanks. It must be a typo, but looking back at the recipe I used to adapt it from, that one is the same. I'm going to have to make these again to find out for sure so I can correct it. ;)
Thanks!